Long Distance Calling
The Krogen 42's great range and luxurious
amenities make it an ideal cruiser
STORY BY IAIN MacMILLAN
PHOTOS BY JIM WILEY

David Smith and Cheryl Essai have made the switch. They’ve done what a lot of Canadians have at least thought about over the last couple of years: traded in their sailboat and gone power cruising. With David and Cheryl, anyway, they went in a Krogen 42. In fact, David, a chartered accountant at Coopers & Lybrand, has picked up the eastern Canadian sales rights for the Krogen line and has been busy showing his 42 off on Lake Ontario.
    “We were tired of motorsailing our CS 33 to make up time and keep a commitment or simply because we had the wrong winds,” David explains. Epitomizing the 1980s’ phenomenon of sailors opting for turn-key boating, Smith and Essai bought Krogen hull 149 last year and haven’t looked back. “I used to spend a lot of time in the cockpit because I was too nauseated to go below in the 33,” Cheryl says. “Cruising is a lot more comfortable now, although I’m still getting used to the noise and fumes that come with powerboating.”

 

    The 42-foot trawler is made in Taiwan (all fittings are North American or British), with a maximum of 30 boats a year leaving the yard. The first one in Ontario made it from New York City to Toronto for about $120 in diesel fuel. With a 2,500-mile cruising range at eight knots, the 42 has tremendous summer or winter getaway potential. And designer Jim Krogen had this in mind when he drew her lines – a true displacement hull with a deep forefoot and a straight run aft to the transom. Krogen has long been designing rough-water work boats and he drew on his experience with Gulf Coast shrimpers to turn the 42 in to this attractive bluewater cruiser.





Jim Krogen has long been designing rough-water workboats. He drew on his
experience with Gulf Coast shrimpers in creating this attractive bluewater cruiser.


SPECIFICATIONS
LOA...............................................................42 ft 4 in.
LWL...............................................................39 ft 6 in.
Beam......................................................................15 ft
Draft.................................................................4 ft 7 in.
Displacement..............................................39,500 lbs
Water........................................................360 U.S. gal
Fuel...........................................................700 U.S. gal

 





    Traditional teak gives warmth to trim and decks, and makes the latter safer to tread upon. And the teak tradition continues below in the floors, trim and furnishings. My favorite cabin on David and Cheryl’s boat was the “den,” with a writing desk, small couch and a Pullman berth above for overnighting guests. When there’s too much activity in the saloon and galley, this cozy hide-away will certainly welcome a weary skipper or mate. There’s a head (with shower) just across the hall on port.
    The master stateroom forward is available in three versions. Standard is a double berth to starboard with a private head forward, but the configuration may be ordered as a double island berth or twin singles. Both heads are electric flush for crew who are too tired to pump the lines to the holding tank or overboard, depending on where you’re cruising. The showers are one-piece molded stalls to make cleaning easier.
    The galley is centre starboard with double stainless-steel sinks, three-

burner stove and over and refrigerator/freezer on the forward bulkhead. Copper piping throughout is impressive, as are the standard 115-volt washer and dryer across from the galley. Little extras like teak dividers to keep plates and dishes in place while underway are nice additions.
    Large sliding windows in the saloon are well protected by the deck bulwarks and bridgedeck overhang, and offer good viewing even when seated. As David claims, “I would have had to buy an 80-foot sailboat to enjoy this much room.” The saloon opens to a veranda-like afterdeck which would be perfect for enjoying the sunset at a quiet anchorage. Detachable screens and plastic windows make it useable in all conditions.

    The powerplant beneath the saloon is accessible via four engine hatches. A Lehman Super 135 diesel (which uses a Ford engine block) combined with a 3:1 Borg Warner reduction gear keeps the Krogen cruising.

    During the test, the conditions were calm and we weren’t able to put the bluewater design to a true test. The craft’s round bilges tended to make it roll, but I imagine in a heavier sea it is preferred to pounding. Up top is an outside steering station with remote auto-helm. There is plenty of space for lounging in the sun or storing a tender here. The lifting boom can handle 500 pounds.
    Inside steering is just a few steps up from the saloon in a graceful pilothouse with teak and bronze everywhere. An impressive wheel, good visibility and plenty of electronics and gadgets will keep the navigator happy. Access to the weather decks is via two Dutch doors where we left half open on our cruise, even though it was a crisp autumn day.

 

Smith and Essal's Krogen is equipped with the standard master stateroom forward; two other configurations are available. Inside steering is a few steps up from the saloon in a graceful pilothouse with teak and bronze everywhere.

 

The galley is centre starboard with double stainless-steel sinks, three-burner stove and oven and refrigerator/freezer on the forward bulkhead. The large sliding windows in the saloon are well protected by the deck bulwarks and bridgedeck overhang.

    A single berth behind the helmsman offers a comfortable spot for pilothouse company, and is suitable for overnighting if the cabins below are full. That situation may arise next summer when David and Cheryl take their Krogen 42 cruising in Georgian Bay with the kids, the kids’ friends and their black lab Kent.
    Returning to King’s Landing in downtown Toronto, we passed a houseboat covered in charter and investment propaganda. It was laughable comparing the two large cruisers. Even though they have motors instead of sails, they weren’t really the same species. It’s too had you can’t charter the Krogen for a week or two. You can buy one, though.

Reprinted with permission from Canadian Yachting magazine.